Posts tagged: Actionable

How to achieve FAME in analysis

focused handsIn retail, and in web retail in particular, we are drowning in data. We can and do track just about everything, and we’re constantly pouring over the numbers. But I sometimes worry that the abundance of data is so overwhelming that it often leads to a shortage of insight. All that data is worthless (or worse) if we don’t produce thoughtful analysis and then carefully craft communication of our findings in ways that enable decision makers to react to the data rather than try to analyze it themselves.

The most effective analyses I’ve seen have remarkably similar attributes, and they happen to work into a nice, easy-to-remember acronym — F.A.M.E.

Here, in my experience, are the keys to achieving FAME in analysis:

Focused

Any finding should be fact based and clear enough that it can be stated in a succinct format similar to a newspaper headline. It’s OK to augment the main headline with a sub-headline that adds further clarification, but anything more complicated is not nearly focused enough to be an effective finding.

For example, an effective finding might be, “Visitors arriving from Google search terms are converting 23% lower than visitors arriving from email.” An accompanying sub-heading might further clarify the statement with something like, “Unclear value proposition, irrelevant landing pages and high first time visitor counts are contributing factors.”

All subsequent data presented should support these headlines. Any data that is interesting but irrelevant to the finding should be excluded from the analysis. In other words, remove the clutter so the main points are as clear as possible.

Actionable

Effective findings and their accompanying recommendations are specific enough in focus and narrow enough in scope that decision makers can reasonably develop a plan of action to address them. The finding mentioned above regarding Google search visitors fits the bill, and a recommendation that focuses on modifying landing pages to match search terms would be appropriate. Less appropriate would be a vague finding like “customers coming from Google search terms are viewing more pages than customers coming from email campaigns” accompanied by an equally vague recommendation to “consider ways to reduce pages clicked by Google search campaign visitors.” Is viewing more pages good or bad? Why? The recommendation in this case insinuates that it’s bad, but it’s not clear why. What’s the benefit of taking action in quantifiable terms?

Truly actionable analysis doesn’t burden decision makers with connecting the data to executable conclusions. In other words, the thought put into the analysis should make the diagnosis of problems clear so that decision makers can get to work on determining necessary solutions.

Manageable

The number of findings in any set of analyses should be contained enough that the analyst and anyone in the audience can recite the findings and recommendations (but not all the supporting details) in 30 seconds. Sometimes, less is more. This constraint helps ease the subsequent communication that will be necessary to reasonably react to the findings and plan and execute a response. Conversely, information overload obscures key messages and makes it difficult for teams to coalesce around key issues.

Enlightening

Last, but most certainly not least, effective findings are enlightening. Effective analyses should present — and support with clear, credible data — a view of the business that is not widely held. They should, at the very least, elicit a “hmmm…” from the audience and ideally a “whoa!” They should excite decision makers and spur them to action.

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The FAME attributes are not always easy to achieve. They require a lot of hard thought, but the value of clear, data-supported insight to an organization is immense.

The most effective analysts I’ve seen achieve FAME on a regular basis. They have a thorough understanding of the business’ objectives, and they develop their insights to help decision makers truly understand what’s working and what’s not working. And then they lay out clear opportunities for improvement. That’s data-driven business management at its best.

What do you think? What attributes do you find key in effective analyses?

Retail: Shaken Not Stirred by Kevin Ertell


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