Posts tagged: customer retention

Bought Loyalty vs. Earned Loyalty

Earned loyalty vs Bought loyaltyAcquiring new customers is hard work, but turning them into loyal customers is even harder. The acquisition efforts can usually come almost solely from the Marketing department, but customer retention takes a village. And all those villagers have to march to the beat of a strategy that effectively balances the concepts of bought loyalty and earned loyalty.

I first heard the concepts of bought and earned loyalty many years ago in a speech given by ForeSee Results CEO Larry Freed, and those concepts stuck with me.  They’re not mutually exclusive. In the most effective retention strategies I’ve seen, bought loyalty is a subset of a larger earned loyalty strategy.

So let’s break each down a bit and discuss how they work together.

Bought loyalty basically comes in the form of promotional discounts. We temporarily reduce prices in the form of sales or coupons in order to induce customers to shop with us right away.

Bought loyalty has lots of positives. It’s generally very effective at increasing top line sales immediately (especially in down economies), and customers love a good deal. It’s also pretty easy to measure the improvement in sales during a short promotional period, and sales growth feels good. Really good.

And those good feelings are mighty addictive.

But as with most addictions, the negative effects tend to sneak up on us and punch us in the face. The 10% quarterly offers become 15% monthly offers and then 20% weekly offers as customers wait for better and better deals before they shop. Top line sales continue to grow only at the cost of steadily reduced margins. Breaking the habit comes with a lot of pain as customers trained to wait for discounts simply stop shopping. Bought loyalty, by itself,  is fickle.

But it doesn’t have to go down that way.

We can avoid a bought loyalty slippery slope when we incorporate bought loyalty tactics as part of a larger earned loyalty strategy.

We earn our customers’ loyalty when we meet not only their wants but their needs. After all, retail is a service business. We have to learn a lot about our customers to know what those wants and needs are so that we align our offerings to meet those wants and needs. Which, of course, is easy to say and much more difficult to do. But do it we must.

To earn loyalty, we have to provide great service and convenience for our customers. But we have to know how our customers define “great service” and “convenience” and ensure we’re delivering to those definitions. Earning loyalty means offering relevant assortments and personalized messaging, but it’s only by truly understanding our customers that we can know what “relevant” and “personalized” mean to them. And a little bit of bought loyalty through truly valuable promotions can provide an occasional kick start, but we have to know what “valuable promotion” means to our customers.

We earn loyalty when the experience we provide our customers meets or even exceeds their expectations. As such, our earned loyalty retention strategies have to start before we’ve even acquired the customer. If we over-promise and under-deliver, we significantly reduce our ability to retain customers, much less move them through the Customer Engagement Cycle we’ve discussed here previously.

But earned loyalty can’t just be the outcome of a marketing campaign. It’s much bigger than that, and it doesn’t happen without the participation of the entire organization. Clearly, front line staff in stores, call center agents and those who create the online customer experience have to be on board. But so too do corporate staff, including merchants for assortment and marketers for messaging. And financial models for earned loyalty strategies inevitably look different than those built solely for bought loyalty.

Since customer expectations are in constant flux, we have to constantly measure how well we’re doing in their eyes. Those measures must be Key Performance Indicators held in as high a regard as revenue, margins, average order size and conversion rates. (Shameless plug: the best way I know to measure customer experience and satisfaction is the ACSI methodology provided by ForeSee Results). Our customers’ perceptions of our business are reality, and measuring and monitoring those perceptions to determine what’s working and what’s not is the best way to determining a path towards earning loyalty.

Earning loyalty requires clear vision, careful planning, a little bought loyalty, lots and lots of communication (both internally and externally), and some degree of patience to wait for its value to take hold. But when the full power of an earned loyalty Customer Engagement Cycle kicks in, its effects can be mighty. The costs of acquiring and retaining customers drop while sales and margins rise. That’s a nice equation.

What do you think? Have you seen effective retention strategies that build on both bought and earned loyalty? Or do you think is all just a crock?

The Case to Cross It Up

For any retailer with more than one channel, becoming cross-channel is a critically important way to fully leverage its assets to provide a greater experience to its customers, which ultimately leads to more customer retention, brand loyalty and, of course, sales and profits.

In an effort to highlight and tackle the issues associated with implementing cross channel strategies, Kasey Lobaugh of Deloitte Consulting and Jim Bengier of Sterling Commerce pulled together a Cross Channel Retail Consortium of retail thought leaders that included executives from a cross section of retailers as well as some industry analysts, vendors and yours truly for a day of discussion this past Sunday on the strategy, tactics and challenges of implementing effective retail cross channel experiences for our customers.

Before I delve deeper into my thoughts on the day, it’s probably worth defining “cross channel.” Many times, “multi-channel” and “cross-channel” are used interchangeably, but I don’t think they’re the same thing at all. “Multi-channel” is simply operating in more than one channel while “cross-channel” is leveraging the strengths of each channel to create an overall customer experience that is greater than the sum of its parts. It’s 1+1=3.

Sounds great, right? So, why aren’t more retailers doing it?

Three basic themes emerged from the group:

  1. Lack of executive and board level understanding of the value of customers transacting in multiple channels (and, conversely, the negative affects that occur when customers are prevented from interacting with a brand across channels)
  2. Lack of incentives for various employees, from executive to front line staff, to encourage shopping across channels
  3. IT systems limitations

So, let’s tackle these issues one-by-one.

1. Lack of executive and board level understanding of the value of creating cross channel experiences

The group agreed that getting the buy-in of the CEO is critical. No one believed, and I certainly agree, that a strategy as all-encompassing as creating a cross channel experience has any chance at success without the CEO actively driving it. So, just get the CEO to support it. Easy, right? Not so much.

In my experience, the best way to convince a CEO of the value of any strategy is to show him or her how it will maximize profits. One retailer in the room was able to show the value of customers shopping in multiple channels pretty easily by tracking customer transactions in all channels through a loyalty program. Others were able to do the same in various degrees, but the general concern was the potentially high cost of discounts provided in exchange for such information. (I have lots to say about loyalty programs, but I’ll save that for another post). Janet Sherlock of AMR Research extolled the virtues of emailed receipts as an environmentally attractive and altogether less costly alternative option to harness ID’d transactions. I find that proposal extremely intriguing.

While transactions tell us about customers who completed transactions in each channel, they don’t tell us about customers who researched online to buy in store or customers who took a look at products in store before buying online, and the group longed for an industry standard metric that could be used to assess the amount of sales influenced by the another channel.

Another driver of CEO support is attention to the issue from the Board. One retailer said all it took was a bad experience by one 17-year-old granddaughter of a Board member to get the issue front and center. Funny how life is, isn’t it? Who could imagine that one young girl’s frustration can drive a strategic shift in a major national retailer? But maybe the lesson here is about the importance of getting decision makers’ heads out of the financial spreadsheets and into real-life experiences to help them understand how their companies are (or are not) serving their customers.

2. Lack of incentives for various employees to encourage shopping across channels

One retailer described the challenges of focusing on customer experience at a retailer that is driven by “an imperialist merchant organization.” (There was no way I could write this piece without including that quote.) Merchants, by their nature, tend to care a lot more about product than customers. But in the end, they’re generally heavily driven by sales, margin and turn metrics. There are many cross channel strategies can be implemented to help merchants drive these key metrics.

For example, the web has many selling capabilities that are nearly impossible to achieve in store because of physical constraints. Customer reviews are extremely popular online and customers regularly report using them to make purchase decisions (both online and in store); however, they are very difficult to make available in a physical environment. Some retailers are making them available via in-store kiosks, but the kiosks are a large capital investment to make if they’re not already available. But just about everyone’s got a computer in his or her pocket or purse these days. Let’s make more use of mobile phone technology to give people access to customer reviews, recommendations, wish lists, gift registries, etc. in store while they’re standing in front of the products.

There are also advantages in stores than can be leveraged online. Many retailers have incredible experts in their stores. How can those experts build content that can be used by customers and other employees alike to improve the shopping experience? How about security? Should retailers start to look for ways to accept payment in their stores for web orders when customers aren’t comfortable paying online? Believe it or not, there are still a lot of customers out there who aren’t comfortable using a credit card online, and in this economy there are more and more customers who aren’t comfortable or aren’t able to use credit cards period. But they’re still interested in buying from us, and we should find every way we can to help them do so.

3. IT systems limitations

There’s no question that IT legacy systems cause us a lot of trouble when we try to integrate our customer experiences. But I also wonder how many times we fall back too easily on such an excuse. I’ve written about my Tree Stump Theory previously, and it’s certainly prevalent in this case. We have a lot of compelling reasons why systems prevent us from implementing such key capabilities as the ability to accept returns of online purchases in store. But guess what? Our customers don’t know those reasons, and even if they did, they don’t care. While many retailers have found ways around the returns issues, just as many still have not. Either way, the case to prioritize such efforts should rely on some of the same techniques described above to make compelling cases to the CEO and the incent imperialist merchants.

Pure play retailers, and especially Amazon, continue to grow at rapid rates by pulling more and more market share. Multi-channel retailers have assets in their stores that pure plays don’t, but it’s going to take implementing true cross channel strategies to leverage those assets in a competitively advantageous way. Let’s cross it up!

What cross-channel strategies have you implemented or are considering implementing? What are the barriers to cross-channel in your organization?

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons



Retail: Shaken Not Stirred by Kevin Ertell


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