Posts tagged: customer reviews

My Favorite Sites of the Year

It’s the end of the year and the end of an amazing decade for e-commerce. So, in keeping with the time-honored tradition of awarding “bests” at the end of the year, I’m listing some of my favorites sites and site features of the year. I always enjoy discovering new sites and techniques when I read other people’s lists like this, so I hope you’ll find something interesting in my web award show.

The overall best e-commerce site award goes to:

Moosejaw.com

Moosejaw has it all. They’ve done an excellent job creating a very intuitive site that provides lots of options to narrow your selection; you can easily sort by price, color, size and brand. They have lots of what they call “custy reviews” available for their products, and you can even choose a “custy reviews” search/browse results page that highlights recent reviews in the product listing. Moosejaw has a great checkout process that does a good job of guiding the customer through the process, and their error messaging is clear and easy to understand. And no commentary on Moosejaw would be complete without mention of their Madness section, which is full of wacky content that keeps you coming back for more. In a final stroke of branding brilliance, Moosejaw provides free Moosejaw flags to anyone who requests them, and encourages people to take photos of themselves with Moosejaw flags at the height of their adventures, literally, like at the top of a mountain. What a brilliant way to make your customers your greatest marketers. As a final point of support for this award, when I asked people around the office for their favorites sites, Moosejaw was by far the most common choice.

Runner-up

Net-a-Porter

Net-a-Porter shows they understand how their customers shop, and they understand that the self-service experience of the web requires extra attention. They have a prominent “What’s New” section, and their landing pages get right to the products (without lots of “window” signs screaming about promotions). Each item in the listing has an alternate view when hovering over it, which is becoming fairly common, but Net-a-Porter uses and alternate view that features the item being worn rather than just showing it from the back. When you click through to the product pages, there are many more product views and some items have an excellent video of a model walking in the clothes so customers can see how the clothing looks in action. Finally, there are details about how items fit and an invitation to contact a “Fashion Advisor” for more help if you need it.

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Best use of video:

K-Swiss

I’ve always wondered why more sites don’t do what K-Swiss is doing with their product videos. Namely, use them as the primary image for the product when they’re available.

When you arrive at a product page that features a video (which, unfortunately, isn’t all of them) the video launches immediately and shows a model walking in the item. You can easily switch the view to see her walking from the front, from either side and from the back.  And best of all, there’s not sound that could get a workplace shopper in trouble. 🙂 K-Swiss also features multiple static images of product to ensure customers are getting as much information as possible.

Runner-up

Ice.com

Ice.com is also making excellent use of video and using it as their primary image when a video is available. And they’re getting great results. Ice’s Pinny Gniwisch reports conversion rates jumping a whopping 400% after customers view a video, and return rates drop 25% for products with videos. Video really helps give customers a much better understanding of what they’re buying, which helps to remove one more barrier to purchasing products online. I’m really impressed with the quality of the short videos they’re producing, as well. The folks at Ice.com clearly understand the value of video, and they’re making the right investment to improve their business.

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Most interesting merchandising tool:

Polyvore

Polyvore is not a retailer, but that doesn’t mean there’s not something to learn from or leverage what they’re doing. They call themselves “a fashion community site that lets you mix and match products from any online store to create outfits or any kind of collage. It is also a vibrant community of creative and stylish people.” They have a really cool drag and drop capability that let’s visitors “create looks” from product feeds from many different retailers. Essentially, the visitors become merchandisers, and they’re looks are posted to be voted on and commented on by the community. The best looks rise to the top. There are some really amazing collections, and of course each product has a buy button. Polyvore is now making their technology available to retailers, as can be seen in Charlotte Russe “Design Your Outfit” section.

Runner up:

Hunch

Hunch is also not a retailer, but as with Polyvore, there’s lots to learn and leverage. Hunch describes themselves as “a decision-making tool that gets smarter the more you use it. After asking you 10 questions or less, Hunch will provide a concrete result for decisions of every kind.” Basically, they ask you a series of questions and then provide product recommendations that match. The general concept is not new, but Hunch’s implementation is the best I’ve seen and it gets better the more it’s used. They’re using the community to build and refine the question sets, and they’re covering a massive range of topics. The whole experience is really addictive.

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Most proactive:

Restaurant.com

Poorly written error messages are the bane of the web and a shameful way to lose sales, as I’ve previously discussed. But even well written error messages can be annoying because they come after the fact. Restaurant.com has taken a proactive approach in their account creation process. As a visitor enters a form field, a small box appears to the right giving the user detailed descriptions about what’s expected to be entered and, when appropriate, giving the reason why it’s important. Try it out to see how helpful it is.

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I could go on and on about lots of great features on a lot of different sites, but the seven above really stood out for me as great examples worth checking out.

But there are tons of great sites I haven’t even seen.

What sites stand out for you? I would be grateful if you’d use the comments section to share your favorites with the rest of us.

Sitting in the “Marketing Hot Seat”

My good buddy Adam Cohen, a Rosetta partner who heads up their Search, Online and Social Media businesses, issued a challenge called “The Marketing Hot

You’re the CMO.  You
have a marketing budget of $1M.  Your company is a consumer product
company, relatively unknown / early stage.  Customers who know the
product like it. CEO wants ROI within 12 months.  What do you do?

I thought this would be a fun exercise to take on, particularly because the scenario placed me in the seat of a manufacturer, publisher or product company. Would my retail oriented perspective provide a different line of thinking than would typically come from a manufacturer, and would that perspective be worthwhile? I’d certainly love to know your thoughts.

My take is actually the first one Adam posted on his blog, A Thousand Cuts. Check things out over there over the next few weeks to see perspectives from the other 12 bloggers.

Here’s my answer to Adam’s challenge:

OK.
Setting aside all the caveats about the fact that I don’t know what the product is, what it costs to make and what our margins are, here’s generically how I would approach the situation:

Strategy

  1. Thoroughly understand the customers who like our product
    The customers who know our product like it. We need to find out why, in their words, and determine what personality traits, hobbies, demographics, etc. in those customers are relevant to their liking our products so that we can speak to others like them.
  2. Get our online destinations right
    With a relatively small marketing budget, we’re going to need to maximize our online strategy. (Actually, we should do that even if have a large marketing budget.) We need to make sure our website and our retailer websites are highly usable and highly effective in merchandising our product and providing the ability for customers to easily spread the word about us.
  3. Drive traffic with whatever budget is left
    Only when we have ensured that we have solid destinations for our traffic will we start to actively search for traffic.


Tactics

  1. Learn as much as we can about the customers who most love the product.
    Why do they like it? What are there personality types; let’s use the Myers-Briggs personality test and really get a  thorough understanding of these folks. How do they describe our product? Let’s pay attention to the words they  use as we’re going to reuse those words in our copy.
  2. Hire ForeSee Results to measure our site’s effectiveness from our customers’ perspectives.
    I realize this may seem self-serving since it’s my company, but I was a client for seven years before joining the  company three months ago, and I’ve see how well it works.  So, I want it in this role. So there! We’ll use  measurements, analysis, Session Replay and usability audits to ensure we’re providing the best experience  we can.
  3. Hire Bryan Eisenberg to develop archetypes and to implement Persuasion Architecture on our site.
    We need to speak to customers in language that resonates, and Bryan understands how to do that. We’ll also use  his language for product descriptions and other content we give to retailers for their sites.
  4. Create a high quality product video.
    We’ll use this video on our own site and we’ll give it to retailers for their sites. We’ll focus on the key aspects  customers love and use copy that includes words that resonate with those customers. We’ll also show real  customer testimonials.
  5. Launch customer reviews and customer forums on our site
    We need to make sure our customers can openly provide their thoughts about our product, even when  they’re negative.
  6. Launch several blogs on our site
    Since we only have one product, we need to provide some fresh and compelling content on our site to give people a reason to come back. The content doesn’t need to be about the product all the time. It can be able anything, as  long as it’s compelling. I’ll focus on general marketing, our CEO can blog about leadership, and we’ll find some  people to blog about topics our customers are interested in. All of this blog content will also be great for SEO.
  7. Launch a marketing campaign to retailers informing them about key customers and teaching them how to sell the product
    Our initial marketing efforts will essentially be internal. Let’s get the sellers pumped up and doing their jobs well  before we send customers their way.
  8. Develop a widget for retailers that gives customers the ability to easily share information about the product
    We need to give our customers ways to share information about our product on their own in a way that is easy and  positive. Let’s create a fun widget that people want to share on Facebook, Twitter, email, etc.
  9. Get our SEO right, buy search terms, send emails, run re-marketing campaigns, etc.
    I don’t want to minimize the value of these techniques, but we really need to make sure our destinations are right  before we add lots of traffic.So there you have it. My main point here is to focus on the customers first, the destination second and the traffic driving last.

What do you think? Does my strategy make sense? How would you have addressed the challenge? Do your manufacturer/publisher/product partners address your needs?

The Case to Cross It Up

For any retailer with more than one channel, becoming cross-channel is a critically important way to fully leverage its assets to provide a greater experience to its customers, which ultimately leads to more customer retention, brand loyalty and, of course, sales and profits.

In an effort to highlight and tackle the issues associated with implementing cross channel strategies, Kasey Lobaugh of Deloitte Consulting and Jim Bengier of Sterling Commerce pulled together a Cross Channel Retail Consortium of retail thought leaders that included executives from a cross section of retailers as well as some industry analysts, vendors and yours truly for a day of discussion this past Sunday on the strategy, tactics and challenges of implementing effective retail cross channel experiences for our customers.

Before I delve deeper into my thoughts on the day, it’s probably worth defining “cross channel.” Many times, “multi-channel” and “cross-channel” are used interchangeably, but I don’t think they’re the same thing at all. “Multi-channel” is simply operating in more than one channel while “cross-channel” is leveraging the strengths of each channel to create an overall customer experience that is greater than the sum of its parts. It’s 1+1=3.

Sounds great, right? So, why aren’t more retailers doing it?

Three basic themes emerged from the group:

  1. Lack of executive and board level understanding of the value of customers transacting in multiple channels (and, conversely, the negative affects that occur when customers are prevented from interacting with a brand across channels)
  2. Lack of incentives for various employees, from executive to front line staff, to encourage shopping across channels
  3. IT systems limitations

So, let’s tackle these issues one-by-one.

1. Lack of executive and board level understanding of the value of creating cross channel experiences

The group agreed that getting the buy-in of the CEO is critical. No one believed, and I certainly agree, that a strategy as all-encompassing as creating a cross channel experience has any chance at success without the CEO actively driving it. So, just get the CEO to support it. Easy, right? Not so much.

In my experience, the best way to convince a CEO of the value of any strategy is to show him or her how it will maximize profits. One retailer in the room was able to show the value of customers shopping in multiple channels pretty easily by tracking customer transactions in all channels through a loyalty program. Others were able to do the same in various degrees, but the general concern was the potentially high cost of discounts provided in exchange for such information. (I have lots to say about loyalty programs, but I’ll save that for another post). Janet Sherlock of AMR Research extolled the virtues of emailed receipts as an environmentally attractive and altogether less costly alternative option to harness ID’d transactions. I find that proposal extremely intriguing.

While transactions tell us about customers who completed transactions in each channel, they don’t tell us about customers who researched online to buy in store or customers who took a look at products in store before buying online, and the group longed for an industry standard metric that could be used to assess the amount of sales influenced by the another channel.

Another driver of CEO support is attention to the issue from the Board. One retailer said all it took was a bad experience by one 17-year-old granddaughter of a Board member to get the issue front and center. Funny how life is, isn’t it? Who could imagine that one young girl’s frustration can drive a strategic shift in a major national retailer? But maybe the lesson here is about the importance of getting decision makers’ heads out of the financial spreadsheets and into real-life experiences to help them understand how their companies are (or are not) serving their customers.

2. Lack of incentives for various employees to encourage shopping across channels

One retailer described the challenges of focusing on customer experience at a retailer that is driven by “an imperialist merchant organization.” (There was no way I could write this piece without including that quote.) Merchants, by their nature, tend to care a lot more about product than customers. But in the end, they’re generally heavily driven by sales, margin and turn metrics. There are many cross channel strategies can be implemented to help merchants drive these key metrics.

For example, the web has many selling capabilities that are nearly impossible to achieve in store because of physical constraints. Customer reviews are extremely popular online and customers regularly report using them to make purchase decisions (both online and in store); however, they are very difficult to make available in a physical environment. Some retailers are making them available via in-store kiosks, but the kiosks are a large capital investment to make if they’re not already available. But just about everyone’s got a computer in his or her pocket or purse these days. Let’s make more use of mobile phone technology to give people access to customer reviews, recommendations, wish lists, gift registries, etc. in store while they’re standing in front of the products.

There are also advantages in stores than can be leveraged online. Many retailers have incredible experts in their stores. How can those experts build content that can be used by customers and other employees alike to improve the shopping experience? How about security? Should retailers start to look for ways to accept payment in their stores for web orders when customers aren’t comfortable paying online? Believe it or not, there are still a lot of customers out there who aren’t comfortable using a credit card online, and in this economy there are more and more customers who aren’t comfortable or aren’t able to use credit cards period. But they’re still interested in buying from us, and we should find every way we can to help them do so.

3. IT systems limitations

There’s no question that IT legacy systems cause us a lot of trouble when we try to integrate our customer experiences. But I also wonder how many times we fall back too easily on such an excuse. I’ve written about my Tree Stump Theory previously, and it’s certainly prevalent in this case. We have a lot of compelling reasons why systems prevent us from implementing such key capabilities as the ability to accept returns of online purchases in store. But guess what? Our customers don’t know those reasons, and even if they did, they don’t care. While many retailers have found ways around the returns issues, just as many still have not. Either way, the case to prioritize such efforts should rely on some of the same techniques described above to make compelling cases to the CEO and the incent imperialist merchants.

Pure play retailers, and especially Amazon, continue to grow at rapid rates by pulling more and more market share. Multi-channel retailers have assets in their stores that pure plays don’t, but it’s going to take implementing true cross channel strategies to leverage those assets in a competitively advantageous way. Let’s cross it up!

What cross-channel strategies have you implemented or are considering implementing? What are the barriers to cross-channel in your organization?

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons



Retail: Shaken Not Stirred by Kevin Ertell


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