Posts tagged: customers

Don’t let your brand go LeBron

In case you missed it, last week NBA superstar and Cleveland-area native LeBron James elected to leave the Cleveland Cavaliers in favor of the Miami Heat. He announced his decision midway through an hour long, nationally televised special conceived by his team of personal advisers. It all came across as incredibly self-absorbed and spectacularly anti-fan as he essentially broke up with Cavaliers fans in front of a national audience. He repeatedly referred to his decision as being about “business” and hoped his fans would understand.

But they didn’t understand.

When shown an image of fans burning his jersey, James seemed temporarily startled before stating that he couldn’t “get involved in that.” His Sports Q rating, which determines an athlete’s popularity and advertisers use to determine whom to endorse , was the highest in the NBA pre-announcement, but it’s sure to take a hit now. In fact, this post calculates a drop in Q score could cost him as much as $150 million.

But what does this all have to do with retail?

I think there’s a lesson we can all learn about dangers of making business decisions without fully considering the effects of those decisions on our customers. After all, our businesses wouldn’t exist without our customers, and we continue operations at their pleasure.

We’ve probably all been in those meetings where a suggestion motivated by self-interest groupthinks its way into a spectacularly anti-customer business decision. I imagine that’s the type of meeting that occurred with LeBron and team when they hatched the national TV special idea.

A retailer colleague of mine recently told me a story of such a session at his company. The head of the call center was complaining about volume spikes that kept hitting the call center. Her call center operations were deemed a cost center, so the metrics she used to measure her operation were all cost related. These spikes in volume were jacking up her costs, and she was making a lot of noise about it. My colleague noted the spikes in volume were following promotional email blasts that were widely considered very popular because they drove a lot of sales. No one would even consider stopping those emails, so the group began to latch on to the idea that they simply close the call center on days when the promotional email went out. Seriously. Luckily, my colleague was able to pull the group back from the brink and save them from going LeBron. But it was close.

We have to be careful that we don’t get so caught up in our own perspectives that we lose sight of our customers’ perspectives. Because we have direct control over the experience we provide, it’s sometimes easy to let that control be dominated by our own needs without considering the needs of our customers. When that happens, we’re seriously in danger of going LeBron.

Consider a few potential scenarios:

Does your company’s loyalty program makes its rewards intentionally difficult to redeem in order to reduce costs? If so, you might be going LeBron.

If your return policies make your job easier while making your customers’ returns a lot more difficult, you might be going LeBron.

If you promote a sale of up to 70% discounts and bury only an item or two at 70% off within a sea of items that are less than 20% off, you might be going LeBron.

If you choose to leave in place an onerous process for customers to check the status of their orders because it saves you time and money, you might be going LeBron.

Whenever our needs get way out of line with our customers’ needs, we’ve got a business problem that could be deadly. We provide products, services and conveniences that our customers value enough to give us their hard earned cash in exchange. But the relationships we have with most of our customers are somewhat fragile. When we make business decisions that are primarily motivated by our own self interests (especially those motivated by some subsection of our businesses and driven by short sighted personal motivation), we risk potentially fatal damage to many of those relationships. We don’t want be caught startled that our customers are burning our jerseys. We don’t want to go LeBron.

Instead, we can best succeed by regularly considering our customers’ needs and desires when making business decisions. Such consideration will help us maximize the customer engagement cycle and lead us to solid and profitable growth.

What do you think? What examples have you seen of companies going LeBron?


Sitting in the “Marketing Hot Seat”

My good buddy Adam Cohen, a Rosetta partner who heads up their Search, Online and Social Media businesses, issued a challenge called “The Marketing Hot

You’re the CMO.  You
have a marketing budget of $1M.  Your company is a consumer product
company, relatively unknown / early stage.  Customers who know the
product like it. CEO wants ROI within 12 months.  What do you do?

I thought this would be a fun exercise to take on, particularly because the scenario placed me in the seat of a manufacturer, publisher or product company. Would my retail oriented perspective provide a different line of thinking than would typically come from a manufacturer, and would that perspective be worthwhile? I’d certainly love to know your thoughts.

My take is actually the first one Adam posted on his blog, A Thousand Cuts. Check things out over there over the next few weeks to see perspectives from the other 12 bloggers.

Here’s my answer to Adam’s challenge:

OK.
Setting aside all the caveats about the fact that I don’t know what the product is, what it costs to make and what our margins are, here’s generically how I would approach the situation:

Strategy

  1. Thoroughly understand the customers who like our product
    The customers who know our product like it. We need to find out why, in their words, and determine what personality traits, hobbies, demographics, etc. in those customers are relevant to their liking our products so that we can speak to others like them.
  2. Get our online destinations right
    With a relatively small marketing budget, we’re going to need to maximize our online strategy. (Actually, we should do that even if have a large marketing budget.) We need to make sure our website and our retailer websites are highly usable and highly effective in merchandising our product and providing the ability for customers to easily spread the word about us.
  3. Drive traffic with whatever budget is left
    Only when we have ensured that we have solid destinations for our traffic will we start to actively search for traffic.


Tactics

  1. Learn as much as we can about the customers who most love the product.
    Why do they like it? What are there personality types; let’s use the Myers-Briggs personality test and really get a  thorough understanding of these folks. How do they describe our product? Let’s pay attention to the words they  use as we’re going to reuse those words in our copy.
  2. Hire ForeSee Results to measure our site’s effectiveness from our customers’ perspectives.
    I realize this may seem self-serving since it’s my company, but I was a client for seven years before joining the  company three months ago, and I’ve see how well it works.  So, I want it in this role. So there! We’ll use  measurements, analysis, Session Replay and usability audits to ensure we’re providing the best experience  we can.
  3. Hire Bryan Eisenberg to develop archetypes and to implement Persuasion Architecture on our site.
    We need to speak to customers in language that resonates, and Bryan understands how to do that. We’ll also use  his language for product descriptions and other content we give to retailers for their sites.
  4. Create a high quality product video.
    We’ll use this video on our own site and we’ll give it to retailers for their sites. We’ll focus on the key aspects  customers love and use copy that includes words that resonate with those customers. We’ll also show real  customer testimonials.
  5. Launch customer reviews and customer forums on our site
    We need to make sure our customers can openly provide their thoughts about our product, even when  they’re negative.
  6. Launch several blogs on our site
    Since we only have one product, we need to provide some fresh and compelling content on our site to give people a reason to come back. The content doesn’t need to be about the product all the time. It can be able anything, as  long as it’s compelling. I’ll focus on general marketing, our CEO can blog about leadership, and we’ll find some  people to blog about topics our customers are interested in. All of this blog content will also be great for SEO.
  7. Launch a marketing campaign to retailers informing them about key customers and teaching them how to sell the product
    Our initial marketing efforts will essentially be internal. Let’s get the sellers pumped up and doing their jobs well  before we send customers their way.
  8. Develop a widget for retailers that gives customers the ability to easily share information about the product
    We need to give our customers ways to share information about our product on their own in a way that is easy and  positive. Let’s create a fun widget that people want to share on Facebook, Twitter, email, etc.
  9. Get our SEO right, buy search terms, send emails, run re-marketing campaigns, etc.
    I don’t want to minimize the value of these techniques, but we really need to make sure our destinations are right  before we add lots of traffic.So there you have it. My main point here is to focus on the customers first, the destination second and the traffic driving last.

What do you think? Does my strategy make sense? How would you have addressed the challenge? Do your manufacturer/publisher/product partners address your needs?

Retail: Shaken Not Stirred by Kevin Ertell


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