Posts tagged: elitism

2 important concepts for better usability

As I mentioned in my last post, I believe (and data I’ve seen at ForeSee Results supports this belief) poor usability is the #1 obstacle to better conversions on our sites.  Getting usability right is hard — very hard. It requires a mindset that is very difficult for most of us to develop naturally. In fact, I’d argue that our natural development tends to pull us further and further away from the mindset we need to design highly usable websites.

Two concepts we need to carefully consider — and strike the right balance between — are “knowledge in the head” and “knowledge in the world.”

Knowledge in the head and knowledge in the world are concepts introduced by noted psychologist, cognitive scientist and author Don Norman is his classic book, The Design of Everyday Things, which I just finished reading. The book was originally written in 1988, well before the web as we know it existed. But the principles he discusses about the design of doors, faucets, phones and other everyday things are extremely relevant to web design. To me, chief among those principles are the concepts of “knowledge in the head” and “knowledge in the world.”

Here’s how Norman explains the two concepts:

Human memory is essentially knowledge in the head, or internal knowledge. If we examine how people use their memories and how they retrieve information, we discover a number of categories. Three are important for us now: 1. Memory for arbitrary things. The items to be retained seem arbitrary, with no meaning and no particular relationship to one other or to things already known 2. Memory for meaningful relationships. The items to be retained form meaningful relationships with themselves or with other things already known. 3. Memory through explanation. The material does not have to be remembered, but rather can be derived from some explanatory mechanism.

Knowledge in the world acts as its own reminder. It can help us recover structures that we otherwise would forget. Knowledge in the head is efficient: no search and interpretation of the environment is required. In order to use knowledge in the head we have to get it there, which might require considerable amounts of learning. Knowledge in the world is easier to learn, but often more difficult to use. And it relies heavily upon the continued physical presence of the information; change the environment and the information is changed. Performance relies upon the physical presence of the task environment.

He goes on to note that “whenever information needed to do a task is readily available in the world, the need for us to learn it diminishes.”

It’s very interesting to look at our sites in the context of these concepts. Imagine a typical customer. What knowledge about how to use the site would she have in her head? How does that compare to the knowledge in our heads about how to use our sites? What’s her educational background, familiarity with web technology and familiarity with our sites versus our educational background, familiarity with web technology and, most of all, familiarity with our own sites?

The reality is, we are not like our customers.

It’s very difficult for those of us who work on sites day in and day out to see our customers’ perspectives. Elitism is the source of poor usability. We all too often consider ourselves to be proxies for our customers. It’s easy to do, and I’ve certainly been guilty of it myself. After all, we are customers of our own businesses, and we see things that work and don’t work for us as customers. We have to remember that we have a lot more knowledge in the head, particularly about our own businesses, than our customers do. And that knowledge in our heads prevents us from seeing our customers’ perspectives. We also easily miss lots of “tree stumps” on our sites that regularly get in our customers’ way.

So, should we just include step-by-step instructions for everything on our sites?

No, I don’t think that’s necessary or even prudent for everything. Norman explains lots of design principles that, if applied, should make many elements of our sites highly intuitive without instructions. But we probably should include a lot more help than we do. We really need to listen to what our customers are telling us and watch them use our sites. It’s the only way to get a better sense of the knowledge in their heads so we can know where we need to include some knowledge in the world.

For example, all too often username or password requirements are not mentioned at the point of entry and customers only find out about them when an error message occurs. Let’s be clear about those requirements upfront.

What type of terminology is being used in navigation? Are customers likely to equate “jackets” with “outerwear” or “stoves” with “cooktops?” One quick way to get a sense of terminology customers use is a review of search terms customers use.

Conventions can be our friends

There are certain conventions that are established enough to effectively be knowledge in the head for most of our customers. For example, navigation on the top of the page and on the left are common enough that we can reasonably expect the majority of our customers to find navigation in those places.If we veer from those types of conventions, though, we have to remember that we’re messing with that knowledge in the head.

But we have to be careful with conventions as there are many site practices that might be second nature to us and not to our customers. I once watched a usability session where on-screen instructions directed the customer (a 40ish or so middle class man) to select “the drop-down box.” He searched around the page looking for a box labeled “drop-down” and didn’t find one. That terminology wasn’t familiar to him. Some of our everyday language isn’t as common as we might assume.

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While many of the concepts from Don Norman’s book have already seriously changed the way I look at the world (I think my wife may be getting annoyed at my now constant commentary on the design of every door we see), I most appreciate the relatively simple concepts of “knowledge in the head” and “knowledge in the world.” Forcing ourselves to identify what elements of our sites’ designs require which of those concepts will lead us to create significantly more usable sites for our customers. And more usable sites will absolutely lead to more sales. Woo hoo! Bonuses for all!

What do you think? Do you see your site differently in the context of these concepts? Do you have other concepts you like to use?


Is elitism the source of poor usability?

Most sites are still achieving single digit conversion rates even though customer intent-to-purchase rates are 20% or higher in most cases. Customers are continuing to run into obstacles to the purchase process that need to be eliminated. The good news is that during this time of limited capital investments, retailers can use low cost means to find and eliminate as many obstacles to purchase as possible.

The first step is to get into the right mindset and remove what I feel is the biggest disconnect with the customers that many retailers have: we’re way more comfortable and experienced with our own sites than our customers are. We use our sites every day, and we know exactly how they’re supposed to work. However, our customers are generally nowhere near as familiar with our sites as we are.

Two weeks ago, I was lucky to be able to attend GSI‘s Connect conference for its clients. I was even luckier to attend a fantastic session by GSI’s Senior Director of Usability, Michael Summers. Michael got the audience’s attention pretty quickly by calling us all elitists…and he had a good point. He asked us how many of us fit the demographic for today’s main Internet users and quickly made the point that we were higher educated, higher paid and more Internet savvy — by a long shot — than the average site user in the marketplace. If that wasn’t enough, he showed some video of average Americans shopping online who had trouble with some of what we in the industry would consider among the most basic aspects of websites.

To solve this disconnect we need to see our sites through our customers’ eyes. There are a number of ways to do this that I’ve found to be effective.

  1. Use statistically significant customer satisfaction surveys to get trendable data that will  point to the biggest problem areas of the site.
    The two key phrases here are “statistically significant” and “trendable.” Per my last post, continuous measurement is important to avoid random outliers and uncover the underlying truth. When done correctly, customer satisfaction surveys can be extremely reliable, accurate, and predictive and can tell you not only which areas of a site customers complain about most, but also which areas of the site will actually have the biggest impact on purchase intent and loyalty. This is critical information to provide some some direction on where to focus your usability efforts.
  2. Ask open-ended questions to add color to the quantitative information.
    Quantitative analysis is extremely useful, but numbers alone aren’t nearly enough. Numbers will certainly tell you the problem areas of the site, but to really get your arms around what the numbers are saying requires adding some color to them with some qualitative information. Asking more open-ended questions like “If you could make one improvement to our site, what would it be?” are good starters to bring some of the numbers to life. If the numbers tell you that customers in general are having problems with navigation and you see that multiple customers say in open-ended comments they just want to see all the blue dresses in stock, you might start to consider adding color choice to your navigation. Or maybe you already have an option to navigate by color, but the customers aren’t seeing it and you’ll need to find a way to make it more apparent.
  3. Watch your customers use your site.
    The absolute best way to add color to the data is to actually watch customers use the site. In the past, I’ve seen great discoveries come from taking a laptop into a store and asking real customers to shop on the site while I or someone on my team watched silently. In these situations, it’s very important not to be too prescriptive in the tasks the customer is asked to do. Ask them to “find and buy a new pair of dress shoes” rather than “go to the men’s tab, then select dress shoes and find a pair of black, size 9 shoes.” It never fails to amaze me in this situation how many different avenues customers will take to accomplish the task, and they’ll frequently run into trouble. These trouble spots are the areas to find and eliminate. Some of the smallest fixes can often significantly improve conversion and customer satisfaction.If the logistics of getting into a store are too difficult or you don’t have physical stores, there are technology alternatives, like Tealeaf’s CX and ForeSee’s new CS Session Replay, that provide the ability to replay customers’ sessions on your screen.
  4. Have an expert conduct a usability audit.
    Even after discovering where customers are having trouble, it’s sometimes still very difficult to determine exactly what you should be doing differently to make the experience easier and more intuitive for your customers. In those cases, expert advice via a third party usability audit is an excellent solution. I’ve used trained usability experts in the past to identify specific improvements that led to tremendous business results. Third party usability auditors bring to the table both fresh and trained eyes that have likely seen problems similar to those on your site before and have come up with solutions for those problems or seen how other sites have solved those problems.

Regardless of the mechanisms you choose to use, the key to better usability, better customer satisfaction and the resulting better conversion and sales, is finding ways to see your site through your customers’ eyes.

Are you a usability elitist? Do you watch customers use your site? What have you learned in the process?




Retail: Shaken Not Stirred by Kevin Ertell


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