Posts tagged: employee satisfaction

Employee Satisfaction Leads to Customer Satisfaction (and Big Profits)

“Companies with strong consumer branding outperform Standard & Poor’s index.  It’s a lesser known fact that companies with a high rating from both consumers and employees double that return.”
Carol Parish, Enterprise Global Brand Agency

Employee Hierarchy of Needs

Employee Hierarchy of Needs

I actually considered calling this post, “If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.” In the same way that mothers are often the key connector in familial relationships, employees are the key connector in the relationships between a company and its customers. As a result, if our employees aren’t happy, our customers won’t be happy with our companies and our companies won’t be happy with the business results.

For some reason, the topic of employee satisfaction has come up in a multitude of conversations I’ve had lately. I recently had a great one with my most excellent colleague at ForeSee Results, Maggie Kalahar. Maggie had this to say:

“Employees shape the experience a customer has with your company each time they have contact, making employees the most memorable voice of your brand as they constitute the actual brand Maggie Kalaharexperience.  It’s people who ultimately deliver your brand promise.  It does not make a difference what you tell your customers about your brand if those who actually encounter the customer don’t deliver the values consistently.  For example, one poor experience with a rude sales associate at Retailer X can undo millions of dollars of brand advertising touting “The Friendly Faces of Retailer X”.  On the other hand, when employees deliver a positive experience consistent with your brand promise, your customers will in turn become stewards of your brand as well, translating to dollars for your company.”

Given the huge importance of satisfied employees in the overall success of a company, it’s surprising that more attention isn’t paid to employee satisfaction as a key financial driver. (And by the way, I’m certainly not guiltless. Sadly, it’s taken me way too many posts about other topics before getting to this important topic.)

All too often, we take our employees and their job satisfaction for granted. We focus all the power of our Type-A personalities on achieving financial results, acquiring new customers, launching new businesses, and driving customer satisfaction, but too often we forget about the people who actually turn all those action verbs into real-life actions.

We spend lots and lots of time considering our brand messaging, and we even spend a lot of time teaching our brand stewards (our front line employees, in particular) how to message our brand. But how much time do we spend ensuring our employees have the tools and the environment they need to effectively deliver our brand promises (as well as the actual desire to deliver the brand promises)? Sure, HR probably talks about it all the time, but this is not an HR issue.

This is really about the basic service every manager in an organization should provide to his or her staff in order to achieve those financial goals.

I previously mentioned putting employees first (even before customers) as one of the keys principles of a customer centric organization. The base principle is really the same as when flight attendants advise us to put the oxygen mask on ourselves before assisting our children. If we don’t provide a productive, positive environment for our employees, how can we expect them to provide the right environment for our customers?

But, man, satisfying employees is hard!

Providing the type of consistent environment required to really satisfy employees is actually a lot harder than providing the type of experience that satisfies customers. The reality is employee relationships are more interdependent, frequent, intense and intimate than the relationships we have with even our best customers. And we have so many more interactions with employees, any one of which can potentially derail the relationship if we don’t handle it correctly.

So what do we need to do to satisfy employees?

In my experience, the things that make the biggest differences are not parties, free lunches or even bonuses. Those things, while good and worth doing, are fairly temporary. They come and they go and they can be quickly forgotten if there are problems in the basic working environment.

I think the tenets of great working environments are really more akin to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Maslow’s pyramid starts with physiological needs and progress through safety, belonging, esteem and ends with self-actualization.

The Employee Hierarchy of Needs, if you will, contains a similar progression to ultimate satisfaction:

Basic tools
Certainly, a company’s employees need to have the basic tools to do their jobs. Those tools could be computers, uniforms, office supplies, etc. I don’t think many companies have big problems at this level. I would even add being paid a fair wage here. There can be little question that pay is an important aspect of any job. But getting the pay right is part of the very basic level of the working environment.

Trust and Respect
Trust and respect are the foundation of pretty much all successful human relationships, and it’s certainly no different in employee relationships. One of the best ways to assess the levels of trust in an organization is to examine assumptions regarding intentions. Do policies and procedures seem to assume the employees act on their best intentions or their worst intentions? In other words, are the policies in place mostly to ensure employees don’t do things they shouldn’t do, or are the policies in place to ensure employees have the right environment to do the things they should be doing.

Respect can certainly be gauged by how we treat each other. Do we follow the Golden Rule? In the workplace, one of the best ways to test Respect is in how input is heard from various members of the team. Are people’s ideas, when presented with thought and backed with supporting evidence, taken seriously? For the record, I don’t think “taken seriously” necessarily means the ideas are always accepted and implemented. However, if the idea is ultimately rejected, it should be rejected with the same or better level of thought and supporting evidence. To me, that’s taking an idea seriously and respecting the generator of the idea.

Matching the “A”s
This one is critical, and a mismatch here is often the source of some of the biggest problems I’ve seen during my career. The “A”s are Accountability and Authority. Many positions have job descriptions, but I’m talking about something a lot more specific and meaningful. I’ve found it’s critically important to be very, very clear about what each and every person in the organization is accountable for. This takes a lot of careful thought. Once we’ve defined those accountabilities, we have to ensure each person has the authority to deliver those accountabilities. This is hard. Accountabilities will inevitably overlap in some areas, particularly in hierarchies in the organizational structure. So the accountabilities need to be defined specifically and conflict resolution paths must be predefined. (Frankly, this could be a whole separate blog post…and maybe it will be.)

All of this is made much easier if the company has the types of vision, values and objectives frameworks I discussed in a recent post. Such a centrally defined framework provides the types of guidelines for decision-making that, while not eliminating conflicts and disagreements, at least provides a solid basis for debate and resolution.

Confidence
With a solid framework for decision-making, clear accountabilities and matching authority, employees can begin to make decisions about their daily work with confidence. As those decisions become more and more effective, employees become more self-confident. I’ve always found that self-confidence is the key to success in all aspects of life. Self-confident staff find it much easier to do what’s right for customers and for the business.

Training/Knowledge/Growth
The final layer of employee satisfaction is all about growth. Companies that invest in their employees’ growth will not only have happier employees, they will have more productive employees who generate better and better ideas for improving the company. This means mentoring employees, training them in areas even beyond their current scope of responsibilities, being more transparent about aspects of the business that are interesting to particular employees and more. Creating more skilled and more knowledgeable employees has an extremely high ROI.

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Focusing and delivering on all layers of the Employee Hierarchy of Needs can lead to the type of employee satisfaction that leads to customer satisfaction and big profits (investor satisfaction?). But there’s no question that it takes constant focus and a lot of hard work.

Behavioral economist and author Dan Ariely, in his excellent book The Upside of Irrationality, ran some interesting experiments around meaningful working conditions. He found that “if you take people who love something…and you place them in meaningful working conditions, the joy they derive from the activity is going to be a major driver in dictating their level of effort. However, if you take the same people with the same initial passion and desire and place them in meaningless working conditions, you can very easily kill any internal joy they might derive from the activity.”

We’ve all encountered employees of various establishments who’ve had their joy killed. They’re not productive and they don’t provide great experiences. We certainly want more for our teams and our companies. The alternative of course, is joyful employees, customers and investors. That’s a happy world I want to live in!

What do you think? How would you describe the Employee Hierarchy of Needs? What have you seen work and not work in your organization?

The 4 Keys to a Customer-Centric Culture

customer centric organizationRetail: Shaken Not Stirred reader Sarah submitted an interesting question for today’s post:

“What does it really mean to create a customer-centric culture ? We hear companies say it all the time. I would wager that almost every retailer claims to have it. But what does it really mean and how do you know if you really have it?”

Culture is a powerful and interesting beast, and I certainly don’t claim to be an expert in developing corporate cultures. However, it’s a topic of great interest for me, and I’ve had the opportunity to observe and operate within many corporate cultures. I’ve learned that corporate cultures cannot be decreed from the top as cultures get their power from all of the people within them. While CEOs and other leaders can be influential in culture development, they can also be completely enveloped by powerful cultures that are driven from all levels of the organization and formed over many, many years.

That said, I believe there are certain dynamics that drive cultures, and we can influence and shift cultures by focusing on these key areas.

Without further ado, here are what I believe are the four key facets of a truly customer-centric culture:

  1. Faith
    Customer-centric organizations believe in an almost religious way that sales and profits are the by-product of great customer experiences. They are unwavering in their belief that intense focus on creating the best possible experience for their customers is the best way to grow their businesses. Some of these organization will go as far as saying sales don’t matter, but that’s not exactly accurate. All businesses need to create profits, but truly customer-centric organizations focus on the customer experience and not on directly “driving sales.” They believe the best way to improve sales is to view them as an outcome of great customer experiences rather than something that can be directly affected.

    I once had the opportunity to meet with Yahoo and Google in back-to-back meetings regarding potential partnerships with my company, and the two discussions could not have been more different. The Yahoo team was very focused in determining how the partnership would increase Yahoo’s revenues while the Google team interrupted us immediately when we began to discuss revenue. They said they were only interested in opportunities that would enhance the Google experience for their users. Period. I didn’t take this to mean they weren’t interested in growing their business. They simply believed that Google’s purpose was to help people find all the world’s information, and they would maximize their revenue by delivering on their purpose in the best way possible for their users.

  2. Fortitude
    Relentless focus on the customer experience is not easy, particularly for public companies. Truly customer-centric organizations constantly have their faith tested by both external and internal forces who are looking for short-term sales or profits, even if those sales and profits might come at the expense of the customer experience. Customer-centric organizations focus on the value of a customer engagement cycle that relies on great customer experience as an engine that drives retention and positive word of mouth.

    There will always be pressure to run short-term promotion to goose sales. It’s not that customer-centric organizations don’t run promotions; it’s just that they run those promotions in context of their larger purposes in service of their customer. They focus on earning  sales and loyalty rather than buying sales and loyalty.

  3. Employees first (even before customers)
    It may seem counterintuitive to say customer-centric organizations put their employees before their customers, but in my experience this is true and this may actually be the most important of the four keys I’m discussing here. It’s a bit like when we’re instructed by flight attendants to secure our own oxygen masks before helping our children secure theirs. All employees play a part in the experiences we provide our customers. Some have direct contact with our customers and others make daily decisions that ultimately affect the experiences our customers have with us. Their attitudes about their jobs and the company can make or break the experience they provide for our customers. This is sort of obvious for front line staff like store associates and call center agents, but it’s also true for site developers, delivery truck drivers, mid-level managers, executives and, frankly, janitors. Even those not on the front lines are constantly making decisions that affect our customers’ experiences.

    Truly customer-centric organizations therefore provide absolutely great career experiences for their employees so their employees pass along the greatness to their customers. While decent salaries are certainly a factor, money alone is not enough. An “employees first” approach means employees are treated with great respect. They’re trusted with the authority to deliver on clearly defined accountabilities. They’re also given clear direction and clear guidelines and fully supported when they make decisions that improve the customer experience.  Colleen Barrett, President Emeritus at Southwest Airlines (a customer-centric organization), also points out that the customer is not always right. There are scenarios where the customer is clearly out-of-bounds and truly customer-centric organizations know when to support an employee over the customer. Watch a brief clip of her discussion at the recent Shop.org Annual Summit for some of her keen wisdom on empowering employees and defining an employee-first, customer-centric culture.

  4. They talk the talk and walk the walk
    As Sarah says in her question, most retail organizations profess to be customer-centric. Those that truly are customer-centric talk about customer experience internally exponentially more than they talk about it externally. Strategic and tactical discussions always center around improvements for the customer. These organizations measure the success of their businesses by metrics that represent the perceptions and voices of their customers. They spend a lot of time and effort ensuring these voice of customer metrics are credible, reliable and accurate, and they focus on them incessantly. These metrics are the first metrics that are discussed in weekly staff meetings from the executive level to the front line level. Bonuses are driven by these metrics, too, but the regular discussion of the voice of customer metrics and the drive to improve the experience on a daily basis is what separates customer-centric organizations from companies that discuss sales first and customer metrics later, if ever.

Are these attributes ideals for a perfect world that aren’t rooted in reality? I don’t think so. Organizations such as Google, Zappos and Southwest Airlines attribute their success to such thinking, and based on some of my experiences with them they seem to be living up to the promise. Is it easy? No way. While earning loyalty may not yield the immediate sales results buying loyalty can, the longer term efficiencies gained through providing great customer experiences can more than make up for the difference.

Those are my observations about customer-centric cultures. But as I said a the beginning of this post, I am not an expert. I’m very curious to hear from you.

What are your observations about customer-centric cultures? Have your worked for such an organization? Did true customer-centricity ultimately lead to solid financial results? What would you add to the keys I’ve listed?

(By the way, this is the first time I’ve had a reader submitted topic for discussion, but I would love to have more. Please email me at kevin.ertell@yahoo.com if you’ve got a topic that would be good for discussion in this space.)

Retail: Shaken Not Stirred by Kevin Ertell


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